SF Live Lesson #1: Never Leave Anything in Your Car


It's been nearly 2 years since I have lived in San Francisco. Unfortunately, I forgot the one rule every new transplant should learn once they move here: Never leave ANYTHING in your car, even in broad daylight. Someone will break in, and try to steal your shit. 

I definitely should have known better. Beware of crackheads.

 You've been warned.  

Going, Going...Back, Back..to Cali, Cali..

Am I Doing It Wrong?

Almost 2 years ago, I decided to leave San Francisco and return to my home state of Texas to pursue a new job with a small indie game developer known as Edge of Reality. Not to sound cliche, because I hate cliches, but since it's late, and I have a shit ton more packing to do, I'll put it bluntly:  I had no idea what to expect when I left SF. I was taking on a position that was slightly outside my comfort zone, and leaving a city where I had established a great group of friends that I knew I would miss. Then again, all things happen for a reason, right?

Here's what I've experienced in the last 620 days or so:

I've experienced the joy of starting a new job. I've gotten to re-familiarize myself with a city (Austin) I've loved my entire life. I've rediscovered a place that has undergone a huge transformation in my 7 year absence while still maintaining its original soul and charm. I've experienced happiness like you wouldn't believe, and heartbreak so agonizing that there wasn't enough scotch on this planet to ease my pain. I learned to wake-surf off the back of a boat. I learned to adapt to Texas' brutal summers. I learned to drive again....for the first time in 4 years. I learned what it takes to be a strong & effective leader. I learned new skills and sharpened existing ones. And learned to put myself first, over my job.....

But most importantly, I progressed as a human being. I learned much more about the industry that I have devoted myself to for the last decade. I helped launch a new PC title. I met wonderful, new friends & colleagues. I established a broader network of contacts, friends, associates, and co-workers that I feel blessed to have made. 

And that is what I've always set out to accomplish: To wake up tomorrow a better man than I was the day before. To excel and move forward. And as strange and contradicting as it sounds, I am moving forward once again.....by moving BACK  to San Francisco. 

I mainly write for myself, so I will spare myself the details, but I was given a unique opportunity to be a part of something that I feel will be very special. A rebirth, if you will, back into games media, where I believe I can help grow and improve on an already established brand and help bring it to the forefront of games entertainment and online pubications.  

It was not an easy decision, by any means. I'm leaving behind my family, my friends, both old & new, and a great group of colleagues that I've come to cherish while working For Edge of Reality for the past 20 months. But I had to make a choice, and go with my gut. I wanted to take on this challenge. I wanted to succeed. I wanted to lead. And this was my opportunity. 

Logo-CBS-Interactive.png

So, now that the sappy stuff is outta the way, time to get real: I start my new job over at CBS Interactive in less than a week. I will first venture off to PAX Prime in Seattle where I will be exhibiting with Edge of Reality and hopefully showing off Loadout to thousands of new fans at the Indie Mega Booth, and then I will start a new adventure back in SF with CBSi by helping them grow and improve.

I'm excited to be a part of CBSi family, and I look forward to making new content with my new colleagues. I am no doubt lucky to have this opportunity, but I know I've earned it. I will continue to work on my personal projects with Chris Ostertag and Videograndpa, among many other endeavors, but I look forward to turning over a new leaf, and starting something new. 

Fuck.....another cliche. 

See you online...

T. 

 

It's Been a While.....

So, that was 4 month's ago. I should just pack it up, and consider myself a lazy bastard.

ariman_lazy

 

There has been so much I've wanted to talk about. So much I've wanted to touch upon, mention, dive into (insert any number of cliches here______). I no longer have my DSLR, since I sold it to @Videograndpa, however, that being said, we both have begun a new podcast series on www.videograndpa.com that tech lovers & video enthusiasts should check out. It's simply called The Video Grandpa Podcast, and has taken up most of my time on top of what already has been a hectic work schedule. Basically, it's 1½ hours of me and Chris discovering new beers as we complain about patent trolls, outdated IP laws, and new technology. Give it a listen, and let me know what you think.

This will be a simple post....a small rant. And I'll keep it short: Don't be a douche. I am not necessarily speaking to you (Although I'm sure, at some point in all our lives, we've exhibited douchey behavior).

We live in a much smaller world today than we did 50 years ago. We have the Internet.  Everyone has a voice. More often than not, that's a  good thing. Through various forms of social media, free-expression, and bravery, virtually anyone can now be heard. And plenty of positive things have resulted from people speaking out. However, it's that small vocal group of trolls I am concerned about. And not because we must rid the world of trolls and trollish behavior. That's impossible. It's our reaction to these trolls.... this mindless, antiquated behavior, that we must control.

When we hear what we  perceive to be a negative idea or a threat, real or not, we position ourselves to take one of two options:

  • Dismiss the voice, and choose to ignore whatever impact it may have. (Often, it is none)
  • Or respond.

 

Both have implications. For example, I can decide to ignore North Korea's threat to nuke Austin, or, I can decide to panic and suggest to my local Representative that we should bomb them first. Both have repercussions. Ignore a serious threat, and perhaps the east side of Austin turns into a shiny sheet of glass. React too irrationally, and you start World War 3.  This example may be going above and beyond what is likely to happen, but exaggerations aside, it's becoming far too common for people to react irrationally to things that are far less serious.

They react with hate. With fear. With 5th grade humor, mixed in with the filthy vitriol that is usually reserved for specific hate groups. It's disgusting and it sets us all back. More often than not, it's nothing more than a vocal minority with a chip on their shoulder, hiding behind the anonymity of the Internet.

Responses can be constructive. They can be critical and enlightening. They don't have to be derived from fear and panic. So I ask, if you are going to respond, please do so with maturity. Respond with your intellect. Think before you act. You can have a voice, and not come off as a douche. And the best part is, you will move the conversation forward, instead of setting us all back.

People are always going to complain. People are always going to make threats. People are always going to overreact. Some of it will be justified. Some of it will not. It's how WE respond that affects the outcome.

-T.